Accepting Writer Frustration As Part of Creation

Ask any writer, painter, photographer, actor or musician if creativity comes easy for them and they will unanimously agree that it isn’t.  There are times when the act of creation flows naturally and feels as though one can do no wrong, yet more often than not, a creative artist encounters and experiences great pains with […]
Ask any writer, painter, photographer, actor or musician if creativity comes easy for them and they will unanimously agree that it isn’t.  There are times when the act of creation flows naturally and feels as though one can do no wrong, yet more often than not, a creative artist encounters and experiences great pains with their work.
The sooner a creative person understands and accepts that frustration is part of the process, not necessarily a hindrance that shuts creativity down dead, the easier it will become to strengthen your own creative flow.
There is a world of stories about the art of creating stories from writers of all creeds.  Some writers work from 4 am until dawn, like Ernest Hemingway did, other writers work through the night entirely like a young Sam Shepard did when writing his early plays, other writers write non-stop for two weeks in glorious inspiration like Jack Kerouac did with ‘On The Road’ etc.
The point is that a writer needs to find what works for him or her only.  Every writer is different and at the end of the day it comes down to what works for you and accepting that difficulty writing comes along for the ride, no matter who you are.
There are some things you can do to free you up and keep frustration at bay.  Little insights to keep close to you when working such as, “Don’t be too hard on yourself” or “This sucks but I can fix it up later” or “Don’t think, just write.”  Such quotes come in boat loads but can help simplify and ease your thoughts while working.

A few pointers to free your mind:

  1. Take a walk.
  2. Listen to music.
  3. Call a friend.
  4. Take a day off.
  5. Read.
Perform any one of those 5 tasks and completely forget about writing.  It’s a way of recharging your batteries for when you get back down to it.
You can also stay put and push through your writing anyway.  No matter how rotten you imagine it being, keep drilling through it until you come out the other side.  This is also a healthy way of disciplining your process and getting yourself more accustomed to focusing on creating.
Overall, frustration does exist but the quicker you accept the dreadful enemy, the less weight you will hold on your shoulders, ultimately freeing you up and giving you energy in your work.
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