Are you an Introvert, Extrovert, or Ambivert?

We’ve all known people who are quieter and prefer to be alone. Oftentimes, we assume that they love quiet time, and if you are more outgoing or loud, these types of people can be a mystery. Extroverts are usually outgoing, while introverts are usually shy, but this is just a stereotype and not necessarily true. […]
We’ve all known people who are quieter and prefer to be alone. Oftentimes, we assume that they love quiet time, and if you are more outgoing or loud, these types of people can be a mystery.
Extroverts are usually outgoing, while introverts are usually shy, but this is just a stereotype and not necessarily true. Let’s take a deeper look at these personality types and try to understand what it means to be an introvert or extrovert.

The History of Introverts and Extroverts

To begin, we should know that the two words extrovert and introvert were made popular in the early twentieth century by Carl Jung. Jung made it clear that these two words were the extremes on a scale, meaning that most of us fall somewhere in the middle. In fact, Jung said, “There is no such thing as a pure introvert or extrovert. Such a person would be in the lunatic asylum.”
There are lots of theories about the two types and what makes them different, but there is one factor that stands out. The main difference between the two types is the source of our energy or how our brains are recharged. Those with introvert tendencies usually get their energy by being alone, and they lose their energy if they are around too many people for too long. Extroverts, of course, are on the opposite side of the spectrum. They get their energy by being around people and lose their energy if they are alone too much. Their batteries are recharged when they are in social settings.

The Brains of Introverts and Extroverts

Science shows us that introvert brains and extrovert brains are different. The differences lie in the processing of rewards as well as genetics. Extroverts’ brains react more strongly when a risk is worth it and pays off. While this can be genetic, it appears that the dopamine is where the difference lies.
During an experiment, people were required to take a gamble while their brains were being scanned. Here are the results:
When the gamble was worth it, the brains of the extroverts in the group showed a very strong response in two main areas of the brain – the nucleus accumbens and the amygdala. The nucleus accumbens affects how we learn and helps make up the dopamine system, which is known for helping motivate people to search for rewards.
The brains of the extroverts in the group pushed them to seek out more novel ideas, take risks, and enjoy exciting experiences more than the introverts. Emotional stimulus is processed through the amygdala, and it’s what extroverts experience as a rush when they do something that is stimulating. These same events would likely be overwhelming to an introvert.
Processing stimulus seems to be very different between extroverts and introverts. In other words, the stimulation process differently in the brain depending on your specific personality. The pathway is shorter for extroverts, and it runs through a part of the brain where auditory, visual, taste, and touch are processed. The introvert brain, on the other hand, runs stimuli through a different area of the brain that is associated with solving problems, remembering, and planning.

What’s an Ambivert?

If the truth is told, most of us are in the middle – we aren’t fully an introvert or fully an extrovert. Due to the ups and downs of life, we all have times when we want to be alone, even if we’re an extrovert. And on the flip side, we all have times when we are so happy that we want to talk to everyone, even if we’re an introvert.

You Are Unique!

The main thing to remember is that no matter what personality type you have, you have qualities and characteristics that make up the person who is uniquely YOU. Learning new skills is always a good idea, even for those who are more quiet and introverted. When you take classes at Lyghtly, you can find an instructor who will work with you and help you learn new skills. If you’re an extrovert, let the folks at Lyghtly take you on new adventures by helping you learn new skills to broaden your horizons and pave the way for new opportunities and relationships!
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