The 5 Most Common Piano Practice Mistakes And How To Fix Them

Learning the piano and becoming good at playing is the goals of anyone who, loves the sound of the piano and wishes to harmonize it with their own fingers. There are fundamental principles available to you that will encourage you to go in the right direction, avoid mistakes and save you precious time learning the piano […]
Learning the piano and becoming good at playing is the goals of anyone who, loves the sound of the piano and wishes to harmonize it with their own fingers. There are fundamental principles available to you that will encourage you to go in the right direction, avoid mistakes and save you precious time learning the piano instrument.

Learn To Take Breaks Between Practice.

It’s counterproductive to practice 12 hours per day without stopping.  Over-practice can have the opposite affect that you are aiming for, which is to become a better pianist.  It’s much wiser to practice for 30 minute or 1 full hour before taking a break.  This keeps you physically relaxed and mentally calm.

Don’t Stay Comfortable.

Once you get the handle on one song, start learning the next.  Keep broadening your horizons and challenging yourself.  Nothing is worse than getting too comfortable playing the piano because it leads to complacency.  Always seek out a new challenge to grow and learn and try new things.

Not Practicing Enough.

Like any true craftsman, time and commitment equal true skill.  Give yourself a playing schedule.  When you know you are scheduled to play, you are more than likely to do so.  If you depend on a sporadic schedule, playing whenever the urge hits you, there will be no true develop and progress made over the course of time.  Only diligent and consistent work will lead to growth and good sound.

Use Two Hands.

There may be a tendency to go at the piano with one hand to learn one part of a song sufficiently before adding a layer of piano music with your other hand.  There are exceptions to this but in most regular cases this is the wrong approach.  It is usually better to play 1-2 bars of music with both hands working together than separately.

Looking At your hands.

When first learning to play the piano or learning a new song, there may be a desire to look down at your hands hitting the keys in order to be certain you are hitting the correct notes.  At first, this may seem like a good idea but on second thought it really isn’t.  You don’t want to fall into the trap of always looking at your hands while playing the piano.  A bad habit can get started without you even realizing it and over time it only gets harder to break such habit.  Be conscious of avoiding looking down all the time while playing.
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